My Recent Pastes (16938 and counting)

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April 18, 2015
3:09PM EDT

2:24 PM

April 18, 2015
3:05PM EDT

Je vais te l'envoyer lundi ou mardi. Comme ca il l'aura avant son anniversaire. Et le 4S les photos qu'il ya dedans tu devrais créer un album de partage comme celui que j'ai créer. Et tu pourras les récupérer comme ca. Envoi le 4S une fois que cest fait. Je changerais l'écran. 

April 18, 2015
3:04PM EDT

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

April 18, 2015
3:04PM EDT

“Amor Omnia,” are among the last words spoken in Gertrud (1964), Carl Dreyer’s final film. In the film’s epilogue, Gertrud, played by Nina Pens Rode, has adopted the habits of a recluse in her old age after an adult life rife with romantic frustration. Calmly, she confesses to her visitor, an old friend named Axel Nygren, that these are to be the only two words to adorn her freshly-commissioned tombstone. Surely this parting phrase, a would-be final statement on the part of 75-year old Dreyer, as an elegant summation of the concerns of not simply Gertrud but of an entire oeuvre, has few rivals for its elegance in the entire history of cinema. In Dreyer, love is, as Gertrud translates, everything; the drive behind the mechanics of his interconnected worlds and the strongest held conviction of all of his characters. What insulates Dreyer’s lugubrious stories of intergenerational intolerance is, above all, romantic love. 
 
        In The Word (Ordet, 1955), immediately after being resurrected, Inger’s first urge is sexual: she draws her husband towards her, her eyes closed as if in the throes of orgasm, and kisses him with a vampire-like carnality, a “visible thread of spit tenuously bridging the lovers.” (Phelps, 2009) But the phrase carries with it something of an ironic bite, as it is love, or her dogged pursuit of it in its most perfect form, which destroys Gertrud’s life. The film depicts the dissolution of two romances in Gertrud’s life, and suggests others; first, her marriage with Gustav (with whom she breaks in the film’s first scene) and second, her love affair with a brilliant, fickle composer many years her junior named Erland. For the purposes of this essay—a textual analysis of three films, including Gertrud— I will be focusing on Gertrud as a thinking, adapting character within an ever-shifting narrative landscape; in scene after scene, Dreyer’s concern seems not to be with narrative in and of itself—with storytelling—but with subjecting the deepest thoughts of a single character, Gertrud, to the whims of a hostile, dynamic world. (A reading seemingly at odds with Gertrud’s reputation as repressed or repressive, a film where “all spontaneity [is] impossible.” ) 
        Gertrud’s belief that “love is everything,” is undoubtedly shared by Félicie, the similarly pensive, idealistic protagonist of Eric Rohmer’s A Tale of Winter (Conte d’hiver, 1992). There are a great many points of comparison between the two films, not least of all is their structuring around the spontaneous, adaptive behaviour of their female protagonists. Félicie faces a similar barrage of lovers and would-be lovers; like Gertrud, she rejects them, though not for want of trying, based on impossible preconditions. Unlike Gertrud, her ideals are not notional or abstract but have their origin in a past romance, explained in a prologue: Félicie falls in love whilst away on holiday at the seaside with Charles, a local chef. Theirs is a romance so intense that Félicie immediately understands the significance of her feelings, that Charles represents all she desires. Due to return to Paris, Charles notes her address and promises to visit her as soon as he returns from a job on the seas; back in Paris, Félicie, now pregnant with Charles’ child, realises that the contact details she hurriedly imparted were inaccurate. Though Dreyer and Rohmer differ in terms of their mise-en-scène, this essay will contrast the methods each director conceives for filming thought on the part of their characters and will study the contradictions built into the performances by Nina Pens Rode and Charlotte Véry. By emphasising the importance of Very’s contribution to A Tale of Winter, the character of Félicie, conceived as a multi-faceted creation with defined, intelligible limitations—her speech, with even greater precision than elsewhere in Rohmer, “[providing] the route to unspoken desires” (Klevan 2000 pg. 194)—is able to think for herself within the narrative; to assess and respond to the changing circumstances of the plot (and of her life).
        Subjected first to analysis in the next chapter and then in reference to both Gertrud and A Tale of Winter in the subsequent three chapters, the third point of analysis in this essay is D.W. Griffith’s True Heart Susie (1919). Though Dreyer admits the extent of Griffith’s influence on his early films in Carl Th. Dreyer: My Métier (Jensen 1995) , there is little mention of the specific works by Griffith, besides Intolerance (1916), that bore the greatest primitive influence on him. Still, the impression of True Heart Susie and Griffith’s pastoral period—the director returning to “small-scale rural melodramas … one of his specialties when he was making one- and two-reelers for the Biograph Company” (Kehr 2007)—on Dreyer’s early work is no less remarkable for it, particularly in films like The Parson’s Widow (Prästänkan, 1920) and The Bride of Glomdale (Glomdalsbruden, 1926), concerned as they are with tenacious young couples romancing within an ornate country setting—the latter ending with an extended homage to the ice-flow sequence from Way Down East (Griffith, 1920). Rather more explicitly, Eric Rohmer, with Jacques Rivette, considered True Heart Susie to be both one of cinema’s greatest achievements (Verney 2012) and, as his essay Rediscovering America  suggests, a clear influence on his own work; “[Griffith] has more confidence in the power of what [he shows] than the angle [he chooses] to show it from.” (Hillier 1985, pg. 85) In chapter two, True Heart Susie introduces the key formal and performative concepts about femininity and thought that are later applied and contrasted to Gertrud and A Tale of Winter. 
Each of the three middle chapters devoted to a study of a single film, with mounting references to the preceding texts, the extended conclusion deals with the three—True Heart Susie, Gertrud, and A Tale of Winter—as a whole, in one exegesis on, suitably, the conclusions of the three stories; and how, by studying the emphasis each director puts on thought and on telegraphing the contradictions inherent in these uncompromising characters, it is possible to, logic intact, read against the grain with regard to the seemingly victorious endings of all three films.   

April 18, 2015
3:03PM EDT

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

using namespace std;

long long phi(long long x)
{

April 18, 2015
3:01PM EDT

16:56
1.1 MB

April 18, 2015
2:56PM EDT

The bartender adds a dash of bitters to a sugar cube before dropping it into the champagne flute, he pours a little bit of Gallentean cognac, then gently follows with chilled Khanid sparkling wine. When it is filled up, he garnishes the glass with an orange slice and drops in a maraschino cherry.

When asked about her favorite drink, the bartender pours up a 'Negroni', 1 part Caldari gin, 1 part sweet Intaki vermouth, and 1 part Matari bitter over the rocks into an old fashioned glass and garnishes with some orange peel. She smiles shyly and says "The tastes show what the empires could create if they cooperated, does it not?"

The bartender smiles at you and says "Sometimes thinking too much may end up leading to failure... There are times when things will work out for the better if you just let it be." and pours up a 'Sazerac' for you. Made with carefully selected Khanid Brandy (supplied from Eina's estate, if you notice the label) with sugar and bitters stirred over ice, served straight up in an absinthe-rinsed glass.

A Minmatar bartender waits for you, polishing glass, he asks a few questions as you walk up to the bar and gives a faint smile after listening to your answers, pouring two parts Thukker whisky, and one part Drambuie over ice in a stemmed glass. He hands it over to you, "I think you'll like it."

April 18, 2015
2:56PM EDT

package org.uonse.components.mesh;

import com.jme3.math.FastMath;
import com.jme3.math.Vector2f;
import com.jme3.math.Vector3f;
import com.jme3.scene.Mesh;
import com.jme3.scene.VertexBuffer;

April 18, 2015
2:55PM EDT

The bartender adds a dash of bitters to a sugar cube before dropping it into the champagne flute, he pours a little bit of Gallentean cognac, then gently follows with chilled Khanid sparkling wine. When it is filled up, he garnishes the glass with an orange slice and drops in a maraschino cherry.

When asked about her favorite drink, the bartender pours up a 'Negroni', 1 part Caldari gin, 1 part sweet Intaki vermouth, and 1 part Matari bitter over the rocks into an old fashioned glass and garnishes with some orange peel. She smiles shyly and says "The tastes show what the empires could create if they cooperated, does it not?"

The bartender smiles at you and says "Sometimes thinking too much may end up leading to failure... There are times when things will work out for the better if you just let it be." and pours up a 'Sazerac' for you. Made with carefully selected Khanid Brandy (supplied from Eina's estate, if you notice the label) with sugar and bitters stirred over ice, served straight up in an absinthe-rinsed glass.

A Minmatar bartender waits for you, polishing glass, he asks a few questions as you walk up to the bar and gives a faint smile after listening to your answers, pouring two parts Thukker whisky, and one part Drambuie over ice in a stemmed glass. He hands it over to you, "I think you'll like it."

April 18, 2015
2:48PM EDT

Mohammadreza
6:57 PM

April 18, 2015
2:46PM EDT

Product reviews are also important, like video

April 18, 2015
2:45PM EDT

Những cảnh xót lòng

Thói quen muối dưa cà gây ung thư nhiều người mắc
Thận trọng với 4 loại rau bẩn nhất vào mùa hè
Bài thuốc kỳ diệu diệt tận gốc bệnh thoái hóa cột sống và đĩa đệm
Người sống chân chết – viễn cảnh kinh hoàng của người nghiện thuốc lá
Hiểm họa khôn lường từ nồi nhôm tái chế, rẻ tiền

April 18, 2015
2:45PM EDT

// BinarySearchtree.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

April 18, 2015
2:44PM EDT

#include<stdlib.h>
#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<unistd.h>

void main (int argc, char* argv[]){
        

April 18, 2015
2:43PM EDT

返回
精彩推荐
        

攻城掠地
三国为背景的策略类游戏

April 18, 2015
2:43PM EDT

--
! Undefined control sequence.
<argument>     \PYGdefault 
                           {o}{*}\PYGdefault {n}{q\PYGdefaultZus {}vector} \...
--
! Undefined control sequence.
<argument>     \PYGdefault {o}{*}\PYGdefault 

April 18, 2015
2:43PM EDT

Partager

April 18, 2015
2:42PM EDT

int main() {
  char peta[505][505];
  int nilai[505][505];
  int bar,kol,jumbatu;
  scanf("%d %d %d",&bar,&kol,&jumbatu);
  //setup
  FOR(i,0,bar+1) FOR(j,0,kol+1) peta[i][j] = '.'; ; //sel kosong

April 18, 2015
2:41PM EDT

apple

April 18, 2015
2:40PM EDT

for (int i = 0; i < 111; i++) {
                        Handler mHandler = new Handler();
                        mHandler.postDelayed(new Runnable() {

                                @Override
                                public void run() {

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